Listen to Podcast
» News Headlines «
- Summer 2018 -

Ticks and Lyme Disease Including Chronic Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease NIH INfo 2012

Your Guide to Lowering Blood Pressure with the DASH Diet

Heart Disease A Visual Slideshow

About Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic Kidney Disease and The Family Doctor

Vitamin D Info

Daily aspirin therapy: Understand the benefits and risk Mayo Clinic

Help Managing Your Diabetes

Diabetes Center Mayo Clinic Link

Lantus SoloStar Pen Picture

Treatment of Upper Respiratory and Sinus Infections

Insulin Injection

Smoking Cessation Center WebMD

Seasonal & Food and Other Allergies

Fish Oil Supplements

Vitamin D Deficiency

Colonoscopy Explained

No Increase in Cancer with ARBs

FDA & Dietary Supplements

Flu Treatment from WebMD

Common Cold from Mayo Clinic

Neck & Back Pain Videos

Smoking Cessation Resources

more...
» Healthtrax «

Physician-Referred Exercise Program
New Patient FormFollow Up Visit
WebMD Health Headlines
‘Consumer Reports’ Finds Heavy Metals in Baby Foods
Aretha Franklin Dies of Pancreatic Cancer
U.S. Opioid Abuse Fueling Life Expectancy Decline
New Drug of Last Resort Tackles Resistant HIV
Research Links Banned Insecticide DDT to Autism
Breast Cancer Drug Promising in Phase 3 Trial
Roundup Chemical in Your Cereal: What to Know
Here’s Another Reason Kidney Transplants Fail
Study: Fluoride Crucial To Prevent Cavities
Abnormal Heat Forecast Worldwide Through 2022
Women Exposed Early to Smoke May Face More RA Risk
Amputation Not Best Option for Circulation Woes?

Low Sodium "Dash Diet" for Hypertension

Hypertension/High Blood Pressure Health Center

 
Listen to this page using ReadSpeaker
 
 

High Blood Pressure and the DASH Diet

 

 

One step to lower high blood pressure: Incorporate the DASH diet into your lifestyle. Doctors recommend:

  • Eating more fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods
  • Cutting back on foods that are high in saturated fat, cholesterol, and total fat
  • Eating more whole grain products, fish, poultry, and nuts
  • Eating less red meat and sweets
  • Eating foods that are rich in magnesium, potassium, and calcium

The DASH diet, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, is an example of such an eating plan. In studies, patients who were on the DASH diet reduced their blood pressure within two weeks. Another diet -- DASH-Sodium -- calls for reducing sodium (salt) to 1,500 mg a day (about 2/3 teaspoon). Studies of patients on the DASH-Sodium plan significantly lowered their blood pressure.

 

Starting the DASH Diet

The DASH diet calls for a certain number of servings daily from various food groups. The number of servings you require may vary, depending on your caloric need. When beginning the diet, start slowly and make gradual changes. Consider adopting a diet planthat allows 2,400 milligrams of salt per day (about 1 teaspoon) and then once your body has adjusted to the diet further lower your salt intake to 1,500 mg per day (about 2/3 teaspoon). These amounts include all salt consumed, including that in food products, used in cooking, and added at the table.

Here are some tips to get you started on the DASH diet:

  • Add a serving of vegetables at lunch and at dinner.
  • Add a serving of fruit to your meals or as a snack. Canned and dried fruits are easy to use.
  • Use only half the butter, margarine, or salad dressing, and use low-fat or fat-free condiments.
  • Drink low-fat or skim dairy products three times a day.
  • Limit meat to six ounces a day. Try eating some vegetarian meals.
  • Add more vegetables, rice, pasta, and dry beans to your diet.
  • Instead of typical snacks (chips, etc.), eat unsalted pretzels or nuts, raisins, graham crackers, low-fat and fat-free yogurt and frozen yogurt; unsalted plain popcorn with no butter, and raw vegetables.
  • Read food labels carefully to choose products that are lower in sodium.

Staying on the DASH Diet

The following is a list of food groups and suggested serving amounts for the DASH diet:

  • Grains: 7-8 daily servings
  • Vegetables: 4-5 daily servings
  • Fruits: 4-5 daily servings
  • Low-fat or fat-free dairy products: 2-3 daily servings
  • Meat, poultry and fish: 2 or less daily servings
  • Nuts, seeds, and dry beans: 4-5 servings per week
  • Fats and oils: 2-3 daily servings
  • Sweets: try to limit to less than 5 servings per week

How Much Is a Serving?

When you're trying to follow a healthy eating plan, it may help to know how much of a certain kind of food is considered a "serving." The following table offers some examples.

SERVING SIZES
Food/amount
1/2 cup cooked rice or pasta
1 slice bread
1 cup raw vegetables or fruit
1/2 cup cooked vegetables or fruit
8oz. of milk
1 teaspoon olive oil
3 ounces cooked meat
3 ounces tofu