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Ticks and Lyme Disease Including Chronic Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease NIH INfo 2012

Your Guide to Lowering Blood Pressure with the DASH Diet

Heart Disease A Visual Slideshow

About Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic Kidney Disease and The Family Doctor

Vitamin D Info

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Help Managing Your Diabetes

Diabetes Center Mayo Clinic Link

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Treatment of Upper Respiratory and Sinus Infections

Insulin Injection

Smoking Cessation Center WebMD

Seasonal & Food and Other Allergies

Fish Oil Supplements

Vitamin D Deficiency

Colonoscopy Explained

No Increase in Cancer with ARBs

FDA & Dietary Supplements

Flu Treatment from WebMD

Common Cold from Mayo Clinic

Neck & Back Pain Videos

Smoking Cessation Resources

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Flu Information

Flu Symptoms (from CDC):

 

The symptoms of novel H1N1 flu virus in people are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.  A significant number of people who have been infected with novel H1N1 flu virus also have reported diarrhea and vomiting.  The high risk groups for novel H1N1 flu are not known at this time, but it’s possible that they may be the same as for seasonal influenza.People at higher risk of serious complications from seasonal flu include people age 65 years and older, children younger than 5 years old, pregnant women, people of any age with chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease), and people who are immunosuppressed (e.g., taking immunosuppressive medications, infected with HIV).

 

Avoid Contact With Others

 

If you are sick, you may be ill for a week or longer. You should stay home and keep away from others as much as possible, including avoiding travel and not going to work or school, for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of fever-reducing medicine.) If you leave the house to seek medical care, wear a facemask, if available and tolerable, and cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue.In general, you should avoid contact with other people as much as possible to keep from spreading your illness, especially people at increased risk of severe illness from influenza. With seasonal flu, people may be contagious from one day before they develop symptoms to up to 7 days after they get sick. Children, especially younger children, might potentially be contagious for longer periods.People infected with the novel H1N1 are likely to have similar patterns of infectiousness as with seasonal flu.

 

 

 

 

 

Treatment is Available for Those Who Are Seriously III

 

It is expected that most people will recover without needing medical care.If you have severe illness or you are at high risk for flu complications, contact your health care provider or seek medical care.

 

Your health care provider will determine whether flu testing or treatment is needed. Be aware that if the flu becomes widespread, less testing will be needed, so your health care provider may decide not to test for the flu virus. Antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu and Relenza can be given to treat those who become severely ill with influenza. These antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) with activity against influenza viruses, including novel H1N1 flu virus. These medications must be prescribed by a health care professional. See section above on H1N1 Swine Flu for further information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flu Warning Signs

 

In children, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

 

Fast breathing or trouble breathing

 

Bluish or gray skin color

 

Not drinking enough fluids

 

Severe or persistent vomiting

 

Not waking up or not interacting

 

Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held

 

Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

 

 

 

 

In adults, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

 

Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

 

Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen

 

Sudden dizziness

 

Confusion

 

Severe or persistent vomiting

 

Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

 

 

See H1N1 (Swine Flu) Section above for further info.